Asparagus

Beets

Blueberries

Cabbage

Carrots

Eggplant

Fennel

Leek

Parsnips

Potatoes

Pumpkin

Rutabaga

Turnips

Winter Squash

History

The parsnip is native to the Mediterranean region. Parsnips have been around since prehistoric times and were much used by the ancient Greeks and Romans. Parsnips became the traditional vegetable to eat with salted fish on Ash Wednesday and other penitential days in England. By the early 1600's, parsnips were grown in America. Eventually, the potato replaced the parsnip as the filling, high-starch, high-protein vegetable of choice.

 


Cooking Tips

Steamed parsnips are delicious served with salt, pepper and butter. Parboiled parsnips can also be finished by frying in butter until crisp. Just like carrots, the greens of parsnips are inedible. The vitamin content of parsnips is not outstanding, although it provides reasonable levels of minerals.



Storage Suggestions

Store parsnips in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for two to three weeks.